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Late December 2016 (21st-31st)

After considerable thought and deliberation, I have decided to take an indefinite break from writing this county birding journal. Over the past several years, thousands of hours of free time went into creating & maintaining this journal; it has been a wonderful project that I hope helped many birding enthusiasts. Free time is unfortunately something that has become more and more restrictive for me recently, and in order to continue my efforts with eBird & the VSO, something sadly has to give. During 2017, I would like to spend more time with my family, more time outdoors and all-around, less time in front of the computer since I spend my work-days on one. For those hoping to keep up with what others are seeing in Virginia Beach, eBird's Recent Visits page should be of great assistance. Also, there are a plethora of Facebook Pages available where individuals post sighting information and photographs, including, but certainly not limited to: VA Notable Bird Sightings & Discussion PageBirding Virginia and the Hampton Roads Wildlife Enthusiasts. Thank you to those who checked in on the journal often. It was a pleasure to work on over the last 3 years, and to my many birding peers around the region, I look forward to seeing you all out in the field! Best Birding, -Rob.

With the end of 2016 quickly approaching, birding observations continued to pour in as ‘listing enthusiasts’ tried their best to expand their annual species lists ahead of the coming holiday season. Reports of rarities continued pop up across Virginia Beach during mid-December with new-found highlights being CACKLING GOOSE, EURASIAN WIGEON & COMMON MERGANSER! Top birds this period also included continuing occurrences of rare GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE, ROSS’S GOOSE, PAINTED BUNTING, LE CONTE’S SPARROW and LARK SPARROW. First-of-season arrivals this period included our first-of-winter Red-necked Grebe (17 Dec) but this should be the last of the expected arrivals.  Occurrences of late/lingering species this period included Cattle Egret (latest 11 Dec), Ruby-throated Hummingbird Northern Parula (16 Dec), Yellow-breasted Chat Black-and-white Warbler (18 Dec) and Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (20 Dec). WEATHER: What few leaves remained after 10 Dec all came down quickly afterward, and deciduous trees across the region are now fully barren in appearance. Mid-December reminded everyone of just how back-and-forth the winter season can be here in coastal Virginia, providing us with days where ice formed on waterways (and our windshields), where temperatures very nearly reached...Click Here to Continue Reading!

Birding momentum continued into December on the heels of last period’s Lesser Goldfinch, and this time around Virginia Beach was graced with the presence of our first ever BULLOCK’S ORIOLE! While many other great birds were viewed this period in Virginia Beach, this will always be the headliner that late November 2016 will be remember for. Not only a first for the county, but for the entire state of Virginia (pending VARCOM acceptance, of course)! Other top finds this period included GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE, ROSS’S GOOSE, AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN, ASH-THROATED FLYCATCHER, PAINTED BUNTING, LE CONTE’S SPARROW and a continuing LARK SPARROW. First-of-season arrivals this period included our first-of-fall Long-tailed Duck, Great Cormorant & Vesper Sparrow (3 Dec) and Common Goldeneye (10 Dec)!  Occurrences of late/lingering species this period included Barn Swallow (latest 3 Dec), Prairie Warbler & Yellow-breasted Chat (4 Dec), Nashville Warbler (5 Dec), Cattle Egret (7 Dec) and Ruby-throated Hummingbird (8 Dec). WEATHER: Early December brought on the demise of the fall colors, as most of the leaves hit the ground through this 10-day time frame, and the forests have again reached their barren, wintry appearance. Early December’s average daily high temperatures...Click Here to Continue Reading!

LESSER GOLDFINCH! While many other great birds were viewed this period in Virginia Beach, this will always be the headliner that late November 2016 will be remember for. Not only a first for the county, but for the entire state of Virginia (pending VARCOM acceptance, of course)! Other top finds this period included AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN, PARASITIC JAEGER, CAVE SWALLOW, SNOW BUNTINGPAINTED BUNTING and a continuing LARK SPARROW. First-of-season arrivals this period included our first-of-fall Fox Sparrow & Canvasback (23 Nov), American Pipit (25 Nov) and White-winged Scoter (27 Nov)!  Occurrences of late/lingering species were limited to a few reports of Ruby-throated Hummingbird (latest 29 Nov). We continue to see White-crowned Sparrow reports from Back Bay NWR and some cryptic species, including American Bittern, Virginia Rail, Sedge Wren, and Horned Lark were also observed during this period. WEATHER: Fall leaf color appeared to be in full peak during this period throughout Virginia Beach, and by the end of November, winds had started to bring down many of the beautifully colored leaves. Late November’s average daily high temperatures continued to (expectedly) fall, dropping to 58.3 degrees F (-2.5 degrees from the mid-November period); after a whopping 7.9 degree drop in the average daytime......Click Here to Continue Reading!

Rarities, firsts of season finds, and late/lingering individuals were all reported in abundance this period! Top birds for Virginia Beach during mid-November included PARASITIC JAEGER, CAVE SWALLOW, SNOW BUNTING, PAINTED BUNTING, SALTMARSH SPARROW, CLAY-COLORED SPARROW and a continuing LARK SPARROW. First-of-season arrivals this period included our first-of-fall Horned Grebe & Common Eider (11 Nov), Snow Goose & Horned Lark (12 Nov), Redhead (13 Nov) and Greater Scaup & Pine Siskin (14 Nov)! Occurrences of late/lingering species included Green Heron (latest 20 Nov), Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (19 Nov), Barn Swallow (15 Nov) and Nashville Warbler (14 Nov). High counts of Laughing Gulls were again reported from Pleasure House Point’s sandbars in the Lynnhaven River estuary, Royal Terns in large numbers continue at First Landing SP, and we continue to see White-crowned Sparrow (high count of 4, all immatures) reports from Back Bay NWR. Lastly, some cryptic species, including American Bittern, Virginia Rail, Sedge Wren, Horned Lark were all observed, and hybrid American Black Duck x Mallard individuals showed up at a couple of locations. WEATHER: On 13 Nov, we all awoke to the bone-chilling reality of our first frost of the season! Mid-November’s average daily high temperatures.....Click Here to Continue Reading!

For a third straight period, dry conditions were maintained, which allowed for excellent birding opportunities. Like last period, there was a great deal of excellent finds to discuss, and top birds for Virginia Beach included PAINTED BUNTINGCLAY-COLORED SPARROW & LARK SPARROW. First-of-season arrivals this period revolved mostly around waterbirds and this trend should continue on into November; we still saw our first-of-fall Bonaparte’s Gull (1 Nov), Bufflehead & Brant (6 Nov) and Lesser ScaupRed-throated LoonPurple Sandpiper (10 Nov)! Early arrivals this period included “Ipswich” Savannah Sparrow (3 Nov), well ahead of their 15 Nov expected date, and occurrences of late birds included Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (latest 5 Nov), Prairie Warbler (10 Nov) & Caspian Tern (7 Nov). High counts of 2400 Laughing Gulls were reported from Pleasure House Point’s sandbars in the Lynnhaven River estuary, and we continue to see White-crowned Sparrow (high count of 3, all immatures), Red-breasted Nuthatch and Purple Finch reports around the region. WEATHER: Overall early November’s average daily high temperatures continued to fall, dropping to 64.3 degrees F (-5.6 degrees from the late October period); the average daytime lows also continued the downward trend, falling to 45.7 degrees F (-2.6 degrees)....Click Here to Continue Reading!

Dry weather continued through late October, and allowed for most areas of the city to finally shed the remnants of standing water still present from Hurricane Matthew's deluge to kick the month off. Like last period, there was a great deal of excellent finds to discuss, and top birds for Virginia Beach included SHORT-EARED OWL, CLAY-COLORED SPARROW & LARK SPARROW. First-of-season arrivals this period revolved mostly around waterbirds and this trend should continue on into November; we still saw our first-of-fall Orange-crowned Warbler (22 Oct), Common Loon (23 Oct), Northern Pintail & Ring-necked Duck (24 Oct) and Greater/Lesser Scaup (27 Oct)Early arrivals this period included Tundra Swan (23 Oct) and occurrences of late birds included Blackpoll Warbler (latest 28 Oct), American Redstart (27 Oct), Black-and-white Warbler (23 Oct) & Black-throated Blue Warbler(23 Oct)As in mid-October, we saw very high counts of Pied-billed Grebe & Northern Flicker but numbers of American Robin, Yellow-rumped Warblers & White-crowned Sparrows also were bolstered during late October. WEATHER: Overall, late October’s average daily high temperature dropped back towards normal at 69.9 degrees F (-6.4 degrees from the mid-October period); the average daytime lows also dropped considerably to 48.3 degrees F (-7.5 degrees)....Click Here to Continue Reading!

Dry weather finally took hold of the region during mid-October, and allowed us to begin the long process of drying out after being inundated by historic rainfall amounts due to the passage of Hurricane Matthew. A major cold front, the first of October, brought us a wide variety of passerines, including an explosion of sparrow species! There was a great deal of excellent finds this period, and top birds for Virginia Beach included GRAY KINGBIRD, CLAY-COLORED SPARROW, DICKCISSEL, LINCOLN’S SPARROW, LARK SPARROW, & PAINTED BUNTING. First-of-season arrivals slowed this period (though this is more a reflection on the extremely high number we had last period), but we still saw our first-of-fall Winter Wren (11 Oct), White-crowned Sparrow (11 Oct), Cliff Swallow & Hermit Thrush (13 Oct) and Surf Scoter (15 Oct)Continuing occurrences of late birds included Eastern Kingbird (10 Oct), Canada Warbler (11 Oct), Blue Grosbeak (13 Oct), Yellow Warbler (14 Oct), Bay-breasted Warbler (15 Oct), Chimney Swift & Yellow-breasted Chat (16 Oct),Wilson’s Warbler (17 Oct), American Redstart (18 Oct), Nashville Warbler (19 Oct) and Magnolia Warbler (20 Oct)Lastly, we saw very high counts of Pied-billed Grebe & Northern Flicker as well as higher than expected counts of Yellow-billed Cuckoo, and both Nelson’s & Seaside Sparrows continue to be found...Click Here to Continue Reading!

Fall songbird migration held firm at the start of the period, but was quickly replaced by poor weather preceding the landfall of Hurricane Matthew in South Carolina. Conditions across the region deteriorated swiftly, and Virginia Beach was again drowned in heavy rainfall, high winds, and coastal flooding. As the storm cleared at the close of the period, conditions turned favorable once again and one fantastic day of migration was observed on the 10th. A couple of finds stood above all others though this period, and our top birds were BROWN BOOBY & ANHINGA. First-of-season arrivals flooded in throughout the period and included American Coot (early), American Bittern, Philadelphia Vireo, Tundra Swan (early), Savannah Sparrow, Hermit Thrush (early), Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, Ruddy Duck, Sedge Wren, Palm Warbler (Yellow race), Black Scoter, Red-breasted Merganser (early), Northern Gannet (early), Blue-headed Vireo, Golden-crowned Kinglet, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Dark-eyed Junco, White-throated Sparrow, Swamp Sparrow, Purple Finch & Tennessee Warbler! Continuing instances of late birds included Yellow Warbler, Yellow-throated Warbler, Yellow-throated Vireo, Yellow-breasted Chat, Veery & Black Tern. Lastly, we saw high counts of Northern Parula, Pied-billed Grebe, Black Skimmer, Norther...Click Here to Continue Reading!

WARBLERS... they have finally arrived! Songbird migration finally stepped up to the plate this period, and hit a home run. After a lackluster fall migration for songbirds thus far on the coast, we were all very pleased when the winds finally made a shift out of the north, and brought down our first groups of migrant passerines. Despite the early period rains, some great birds were observed, and the top bird this period was a rarely occurring fall migrant here on the coast, a LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH. Additionally we saw early first-of-season arrivals of Brown Creeper and Yellow-rumped Warbler, as well as on-time first-of-season arrivals of American Wigeon, Broad-winged Hawk, Veery, Cape May Warbler, Bay-breasted Warbler, Blackpoll Warbler, Black-throated Blue Warbler, Black-throated Green Warbler, Nelson’s Sparrow and Rose-breasted Grosbeak. To round out the new arrivals, right at the end of the period we were also treated to our first-of-season (and late), Canada Warbler! Several species have also persisted beyond their average expected departure dates, including lingering batches of Yellow Warblers (primarily at Back Bay NWR), a pair of Black Terns and Yellow-breasted Chat (at several locations). Red-breasted Nuthatches continue to be reported around the region and it continues to seem reasonably safe to state that this may be an irruption year...Click Here to Continue Reading!

With most shorebird habitat having been flooded by the passage of Tropical Storm Hermine in early September, the number of bird sightings dropped considerably during this most recent period. Primarily dominated by southerly winds, songbird migration also seemed to grind to a halt after the first few days, and by the end of the period, we were again impacted by the remnants of a tropical storm, this one being Julia. As always though, some bird sightings did shine above the rest, and top birds during the mid-September period in Virginia Beach included our first-of-season BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO (a rarity here on the coast, even in fall when they are somewhat more expected). Additionally, we had early first-of-season arrivals of Swainson’s Thrush & Palm Warbler. Other (on-time) first-of-season arrivals included Sharp-shinned Hawk, Nashville Warbler, Hooded Warbler, Wilson’s Warblerand even our first Sora. Magnolia Warblers were observed several times at different locales, and additional reports of Northern Waterthrush, Red-breasted Nuthatches and Peregrine Falcons continue to show that migration is still progressing. WEATHER: Temperatures continued to fall through mid-September and while we started off with mostly dry days, the period came to a close in the midst of one of the heaviest periods of precipitation seen in the region in recent memory. Overall, the...Click Here to Continue Reading!

While the momentum of shorebird migration held firm, and songbird migration showed further signs of ramping up, the front-page-worthy headline for early September is most certainly the fallout of “storm birds” due to Tropical Storm Hermine’s passage through our region. Top birds during the early September period in Virginia Beach included our first-ever report of WHITE-TAILED TROPICBIRD; first of year reports of BLACK-CAPPED PETREL, RED-NECKED PHALAROPE, POMARINE JAEGER, SOOTY TERN, BRIDLED TERN & ROSEATE TERN; first of season reports of BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKEMerlinPeregrine Falcon, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Northern Waterthrush & Magnolia Warbler;continuing reports of our first-ever eBirded BUFF-BREASTED SANDPIPER(S); continuing early reports of GadwallGreen-winged Teal and Wilson’s Snipe; some atypical inland records of storm-pushed Whimbrel & Black Terns; a few other tough to find species like Red Knot & White-rumped Sandpiper; and high counts of migrating Common Nighthawks, Eastern Kingbirds & Baltimore Orioles. WEATHER: Temperatures continued to fall this period, and we have finally reached near-average levels. Overall, the early September period’s average daily high temperature dropped to 84.9 degrees F (-4.8 degrees from the late...Click Here to Continue Reading!

Shorebird migration really ramped up during this period, and with temperatures finally starting to “cool” a bit, birders made the most of it with some excellent finds! Back Bay NWR’s impoundments & beach, as well as Pleasure House Point NA and nearby Bayville Farms Park seem to be hotspots right now. Top birds during this  late August period in Virginia Beach included our first-ever eBird report of BUFF-BREASTED SANDPIPER, early first-of-Fall arrivals of Blue-winged Teal, Northern Shoveler, Green-winged Teal Wilson’s Snipe, as well as ‘expected’ first of Fall arrivals of White-rumped Sandpiper, Northern Harrier, Common Nighthawk, Yellow-throated Vireo, Black-and-white Warbler, Bobolink & Baltimore OrioleWEATHER: While temperatures dropped considerably from the mid-August period, they were still well above what has come to be expected during this timeframe. Overall, the late August period’s average daily high temperature dropped to 89.2 degrees F (-7.2 degrees from the mid-August period); the average daytime lows also dropped to 73.7 degrees F (-7.3 degrees). The previous 10-year average daily highs & lows for the mid-August period were 84.7 & 69.9 degrees F, respectively which puts this period in 2016 at +5.0, and +3.8 degrees when comparing to the averages. Also during the previous 10-year period, the maximum average daily...Click Here to Continue Reading!

After a slight relief from the summer’s heat in early August, a lowering of temperatures was somewhat expected moving forward, however, we instead saw a steep rise through the mid-August period, with three days hitting 100 degrees F. Unhindered by the heat wave, shorebirds continue to move through the region, and species diversity has continued to increase steadily since July. Top birds during this mid-August period in Virginia Beach included first of season arrivals of Gadwall & Dunlin, and continuing reports of Piping Plover, Red Knot, Whimbrel, Black Tern, American Redstart & Yellow Warbler which are all expected in August, but are still sought after targets. Additionally, there was reports of Northern Bobwhite and Grasshopper Sparrow which can be somewhat difficult to find here, though they aren’t unexpected. WEATHER: Temperatures this period made a complete shift from what was anticipated. Overall, the mid-August period’s average daily high temperature rose to an extreme 96.9 degrees F (+6.6 degrees from the early August period); the average daytime lows also rose to 81.0 degrees F (+2.5 degrees). The previous 10-year average daily highs & lows for the mid-August period were 85.2 & 70.0 degrees F, respectively which puts this period in 2016 at an incredible +11.7, and +11.0 degrees when comparing to the averages! Also during the...Click Here to Continue Reading!

After a Late July where average daily high temperatures reached 97 degrees F, we were fortunate to get a bit of a cool-down during Early August. Southbound shorebird migration also scaled up significantly with much higher counts of expected species being reported. Top birds during first period of ‘ornithologic fall’ in Virginia Beach included first of year reports of MARBLED GODWIT, AMERICAN AVOCET & ANHINGA, first of season arrivals of Yellow Warbler, American Redstart and Stilt Sandpiper & a second report of fall transient Red KnotWEATHER: As mentioned, temperatures finally started to taper off after an incredibly warm July. Though we ended on a couple of hot days, the Early August period’s average daily high temperature dropped to 90.3 degrees F (-6.8 degrees from the Late July period); the average daytime lows also dropped to 78.5 degrees F (-2.1 degrees). The previous 10-year average daily highs & lows for the Early August period were 87.6 & 72.3 degrees F, respectively which puts this period in 2016 at +2.7, and +6.2 degrees when comparing the averages. Also during the previous 10-year period, the maximum average daily highs & lows were 92.6 (2007) & 74.9 degrees F (2006), making this year’s period the warmest in terms of daily average low temperatures since at least 2005. While it was hot, this was a relatively dry period and we...Click Here to Continue Reading!

As with mid-July, the volume of eBird submissions was a bit low during the Late July period. Extreme heat is likely the cause, with four days reaching 100 degrees F and likely keeping many birders indoors. Shorebird migration has slowly started to ramp up, and some new species were observed as a result. Top birds during this final period of ‘ornithologic summer’ in Virginia Beach included a single Black-and-white Warbler, ongoing sightings of Whimbrel and Piping Plover, first of year reports of Black Terns and first of season arrivals of Semipalmated Plover Red Knots and lastly, continuing reports of lingering summer species including Pied-billed GrebeCommon Loon & Black Scoter. WEATHER: On average over the previous 10-year time frame (2006-15), the Late July period has featured the highest temperatures of each respective year in Virginia Beach, and 2016 continued this trend. The previous period, mid-July, was the warmest thrice-monthly period since at least 2006, with an average daily high temperature of 94.1 degrees F. Somehow, Late July managed to top this though, and the average daily temperature rose to a remarkable 97.1 degrees F (+3.0 degrees from the mid-July period); the average daytime lows also rose to 80.6 degrees F (+3.8 degrees). The previous 10-year average daily highs & lows for the Late July period were 88.1 & 71.9 degrees...Click Here to Continue Reading!

As is to be expected, mid-July was dominated by extreme heat, which helped to cause some memorable thunderstorms across the city over the last ten days as well. Even with the heat likely keeping a number of local birders indoors, the rainfall did help us achieve a jump-start to the Fall season of shorebird migration, courtesy of flooded agricultural fields in southern Virginia Beach that provide feeding habitat for many species, especially as high tide is reached on surrounding beaches which causes available mudflats and sandbars to disappear. Top birds in Virginia Beach this period included rarely observed Common Gallinule, arrivals of transient Least Sandpiper, Western Sandpiper, Whimbrel, Piping Plover, Pectoral Sandpiper, Greater Yellowlegs, Solitary Sandpiper, several observations of Mississippi Kites, and continuing reports of lingering Pied-billed Grebe, Common Loon & Black Scoter though no American Coots were observed this period after having been found continuously through the summer season until now. WEATHER: The mid-July period continued the overall trend in rising temperatures as was to be expected with summer now in full swing. The average daily high temperature during the period rose to a remarkable 94.1 degrees F (+3.2 degrees from the early July period); the average daytime lows also rose to 76.8 degrees F...Click Here to Continue Reading!

Since January 2014, my knowledge of birds in our area has continually progressed, thanks in large part to such a great community of birders that surround me. In order to keep pace with a constantly shifting understanding of our local birds, this online journal has also continued to evolve, and today marks another necessary step in that evolution. Rather than covering the past Monday through Sunday time period, today’s article, the first of its kind, will cover the Early July period (July 1 through July 10 to be exact). Entries into this blog as we move forward will be released after the 10th, 20th, and final day of each month, for a total of 36 entries per year. In order for entries to be directly comparable year to year (for both species occurrence and meteorological observations), it is important to have dates that are a match, rather than the ever-shifting Monday through Sunday time frames are. I started this blog with the goal of providing one single location for folks interested in the distribution of birds to be able to catch up on recent sightings, and to learn about the unusual occurrences of the birds that surround us. I sincerely hope this next step forward is met with success in the eyes of those that take the time to read it. Having said this, we had a very exciting Early July period with highlight species including unseasonal occurrences of Black Scoter, Northern Gannet...Click Here to Continue Reading!

As mentioned in last week’s blog entry, this one will be the last of the 7-day, weekly blogs. After this week, the blog is shifting to a thrice-monthly article series (1st through 10th, 11th through 20th, and 21st through month’s end) so that as the years go on, time periods are directly comparable to one another; something that is not possible when using a Monday-Sunday timeframe since each year the dates will slide. The next blog will be issued by July 12th, and will cover July 1st-10th, so some information that appears in this last weekly blog will be duplicated there. The reason being, I’d rather have a slight overlap to kick things off, then have any gaps in the information. Having said this, I hope folks are supportive of the change, it will also makes things a bit easier on me to ensure information and photographs are kept to a high standard. Of course, this last week lead up to the Fourth of July Holiday, so a large number of local birders probably spent more time grilling & socializing with family and friends than birding, but we still had an excellent week of reports. The beginnings of southbound shorebird migration is just around the corner, which will makes things quite exciting through mid & late July hopefully. WEEKLY WEATHER: Temperatures stayed pretty consistent with the previous week, dropping only slightly...Click Here to Continue Reading!

Continuing the trend thus far in June, birding has been pretty quiet around Virginia Beach over the past week. Breeding species continue to be observed though, and plenty of eBird checklists were submitted this week. One item I’d like to mention here in the blog is that starting in July, I’ll be shifting the weekly blog to be a thrice-monthly blog. The big reason for the switch, is so that in years to come, this blog can act as a comparison for the same time periods. I plan to split July into Early July (1st-10th), Mid July (11th-20th), and Late July (21st-31st). Each of the months will follow suit, with the third time period always starting on the 21st and ending on that particular month’s last date. The problem with running a Monday-Sunday blog is that each year the dates slide a bit, so each time frame isn’t perfectly comparable year to year, and I think it will be more interesting to track weather patterns and species observations on a distinctly comparable date window. I’ll finish out this coming week’s (27 Jun – 3 July) blog, then then next will be published after 10 July has ended and will duplicate the 1-3 July information so I don’t have any gaps in the blog. Anyways, that is the big change coming up, so I just wanted to give a couple weeks of notice before it occurred. Typically the blogs will be up a couple of days after each tri-monthly period has ended...Click Here to Continue Reading!

For the last pair of weeks, birding observations expectedly slowed. This is typical of the month of June for several reasons. First, springtime migration reached its end, which means new influxes of birds of varying species stopped trickling through the area. Secondly, as temperatures rise considerably this time of year, often times many birders simply aren’t outdoors as much as they were in the couple of months prior. Lastly, many species of birds are no longer as visible, with fully leafed out vegetation obscuring them from view, and breeding having begun, often times these birds will conceal themselves to protect nest sites. Given all this, it is ‘expected’ that June is a slow month for birding, though there are still plenty of birds to be found, many of us were just spoiled by the impressive spring migration showing across the region, and just need to settle into the summer slowdown. But, this week held one fantastic observation that many folks were able to take part in, more on that below! WEEKLY WEATHER: This week certainly felt like summertime across Virginia Beach, but there was a considerable drop in temperatures from the previous weekly period, resulting in an average daily high of 83.4 degrees F (a 6.6 degree drop from last week’s average); the average daytime lows dropped a bit though, to 68.4 degrees F (a minor 1.7 degree decrease). Overall, we hit a peak...Click Here to Continue Reading!

First, I’d like to offer my sincerest apologies for the lateness of this week’s birding blog entry. I have been out of the area (in northern Minnesota) since 10 Jun, and did not have the chance to get everything taken care of before I departed Virginia Beach. Hopefully, next week’s will be back on track, so thanks to those who patiently waited. As is typical of the month of June, birding was very slow across the region with not a whole lot of sightings that were out of the ordinary. WEEKLY WEATHER: Warm weather continued on from last week with, with the daily high increasing to 89.0 degrees F (a 6.7 degree rise from last week’s average); the average daytime lows dropped a bit though, to 70.1 degrees F (a 2.6 degree decrease). Overall, we hit a peak high on Sunday (12 Jun) of 97 degrees F (a new high mark for the calendar year), and a low daytime temperature of 60 degrees F, on Thursday (9 Jun). We experienced precipitation on three of the seven days this week, with a total of 1.53 inches of rain. Most of this occurred on Tuesday (7 Jun) when 1.27 inches fell. For the first week in a while, no birds that would be considered to be RARITIES were observed. TOP BIRDS this week including some of our breeding species that can be hard to find, including a Least Bittern (6 Jun / Back Bay NWR / Rebecca Walawender), a Northern Bobwhite (11 Jun / Pefley Lane near...Click Here to Continue Reading!

As with the previous week, noteworthy and unusual observations were slow during this 7-day period, as the spring songbird migration is now past us, and shorebirds are also wrapping up. June and July are generally considered to be the ‘breeding season’ for birds, and therefore most of the observations from now until August will likely be of the species that nest in Virginia Beach, including birds that remain here year-round (permanent residents) and those the winter south of us but return each year to breed (summer residents). As unexpected rarities pop up, they will certainly be covered in this blog as well, but the likelihood of spotting something truly unusual declines outside of the migration windows of spring and fall. Still, birds are a dynamic group of wildlife, and strange things can occur at any point in time. Some items to note this week, the impoundments at Princess Anne WMA’s Beasley Tract are being drained, which means the Green-winged Teal sighted there a week ago will not likely have habitat for nesting this summer. Also, if the Purple Gallinule is still present, it may be seeking out a new home. Water levels at Back Bay NWR’s freshwater impoundment system remain pretty high for the time of year, and while this is great for wading species like herons and egrets, it doesn’t bode too well for the shorebirds that can use the mudflats. Though, shorebirds...Click Here to Continue Reading!

After three utterly incredible weeks of springtime birding in Virginia Beach, we all expected a slow-down to eventually occur, and by about midweek the migration switch appeared to be abruptly turned to the off position. May was a truly historic month for us on the coast, and those of us who spent time outdoors were blessed by the opportunity to observe species that are not found here every spring. Most of this was due to persistent southwesterly winds early in the month, followed by strong northerlies. The southwesterlies assisted in pushing northbound songbirds that typically prefer mountain corridors towards the coastline. The northerly winds then ensured that those species would stick around in the area, as songbirds depend on tailwinds to help accelerate their nighttime travels northward. Over the past few days southerly winds took hold, which allowed for the exodus of our transient species northward, bidding us farewell until the fall season arrives. WEEKLY WEATHER: This final week of May was dominated by warm temperatures & persistent humidity. Up until this week, temperatures throughout the spring season had remained lower than typical, but this week, the daily high soared to 84.9 degrees F (an incredible 15 degree rise from last week’s average); the average daytime lows also rose considerably, to 65.3 degrees F (an 8.7 degree increase)....Click Here to Continue Reading!

Week Ending May 22, 2016

For a third straight week, bird observations remained off the charts as the peak of spring migration was likely met and passed this week across the region. Back Bay NWR remained a warbler hotspot, and Princess Anne WMA’s Beasley Tract continued the trend of offering up great shorebirding; Rudee Inlet provided views of northbound species as well. WEEKLY WEATHER: Strong easterly winds, overcast skies, and precipitation seemed to dominate this third week of May. Temperatures from Monday-Sunday dropped considerably from the previous 7-day timeframe to a daily high of 69.9 degrees F (a 7.1 degree drop from last week’s average); the average daytime lows also dropped, to 56.6 degrees F (a 2.4 degree decrease). Overall, we hit a peak high on Tuesday (17 May) & Saturday (21 May) of 75 degrees F (9 degrees lower than last week), and a low daytime temperature of 48 degrees F, on Monday (16 May). We experienced precipitation on four of the seven days this week, with a total of 0.77 inches of rain. The continuance of winds out of the north and east provided another great week for birds in Virginia Beach, as migration efforts were somewhat stalled until conditions turn more favorable for migrants to continue northward. The passing of a low pressure system to our south on Friday provided a perfect setup of  conditions for seawatching heading into the weekend as well, and...Click Here to Continue Reading!

For a second straight week, bird observations remained off the charts as the peak of spring migration hit the region. For the weekly weather, temperatures rose considerably this week to an average daily high of 77.0 degrees F (a 5.1 degree increase from last week’s average); the average daytime lows also rose, to 59.0 degrees F (a minimal 0.6 degree increase). Overall, we hit a peak high on Monday (14 May) of 86 degrees F, and a low daytime temperature of 53 degrees F, on Monday (9 May). We experienced precipitation on four of the seven days this week, with a total of 0.57 inches of rain. Continuing with last week’s excellent flow of spring migrants, this week kept up the trend with a ton of great sightings across Virginia Beach. FIRST-OF-SEASON ARRIVALS this week included: Wilson’s Phalarope (11 May / Princess Anne WMA / Andrew Baldelli); Warbling Vireo (12 May / Back Bay NWR / Karen & Tom Beatty); Black-billed Cuckoo (12 May / Back Bay NWR / Karen & Tom Beatty); Wilson’s Warbler (12 May / Back Bay NWR / Betty Sue Cohen); Common Gallinule (14 May / Back Bay NWR / Andrew Baldelli & Tracy Tate); Swallow-tailed Kite (14 May / Red Wing Park / Karen & Tom Beatty); Grasshopper Sparrow (14 May / Ashville Park / Andrew Baldelli & Tracy Tate). In addition to all the first-of-season sightings, there was some...Click Here to Continue Reading!

Right from the get-go, when Karen Beatty reported a Scarlet Tanager in her neighbor’s yard within the Hampton Roads Wildlife Enthusiasts Facebook group to kick off Monday morning, we all should have known what a tremendous week of birding it was going to be in Virginia Beach. With weather conditions providing a truly ‘perfect storm’ for birders, the first week of May was one of (if not) the most active birding weeks I have ever been aware of in Virginia Beach. The number of interesting observations was simply staggering, so please keep reading for all that information below. As to the weather, temperatures tapered back down this week to an average daily high of 71.9 degrees F (a 5.8 degree drop from last week’s average); the average daytime lows also rose, to 58.6 degrees F (a 5.3 degree increase). Overall, we hit a peak high on Monday (2 May) of 90 degrees F, our hottest day so far in 2016, and a low daytime temperature of 53 degrees F, both on Thursday & Friday. We experienced precipitation every day this week except Sunday, but, this precipitation was tied to the reason we also enjoyed our best birding of the year. A total of 1.41 inches of rain fell this week, though the maximum daily amount was only 0.65 inches on Friday. This meant that it was a dreary week, but we were never truly rained out of our birding...Click Here to Continue Reading!

With last week’s steep rise in temperatures, it was not surprising that we saw a bit of a drop with average daily high temperatures of 73.4 degrees F (a 4.3 degree drop) this week; additionally the average daytime lows rose slightly to 56.1 degrees F (a 2.8 degree increase). With decreasing highs and increasing lows, this week was a bit more consistent than last week, though the overall range was 46 degrees F to 89 degrees F from Monday morning to Tuesday afternoon, which was quite an incredible transition. Rainfall was scattered on four of the seven days throughout the week, but only amounted to an overall total of 0.72 inches. Conditions were favorable for songbird movements during the midweek and by Friday a number of species began moving through as a result. The average daily maximum sustained windspeed was 16 mph, with maximum sustained winds of 23 mph occurring on Tuesday. Despite the winds though, Virginia Beach saw several first-of-season (FOS) arrivals this week, which included: Veery (25 Apr / Mary Catherine Miguez / West Neck Creek Natural Area) & photographed again (26 Apr / Karen & Tom Beatty), staying at this site through at least 27 Apr; Blue Grosbeak (25 Apr / Robert Ake / Back Bay NWR Colechester Parcel); Blue-winged Warbler, a rare transient through our area (26 Apr /...Click Here to Continue Reading!

The cool weather of the last couple of weeks came to a screeching halt this week. Temperatures rose quite dramatically with an average daily high temperature of 77.7 degrees F (a 12.8 degree spike from last week’s average); the average daytime lows also rose, but not quite as drastically, to 53.3 degrees F (a 4.6 degree increase). This meant that the daytime lows & highs had quite a range, with anywhere from 44 degrees F to 88 degrees F being felt throughout the week. Precipitation occurred on Friday/Saturday, as an impressive front moved through the area, inundating Virginia Beach with widespread downpours. At Oceana Naval Air Station (the site I use for weather data in Virginia Beach), 0.85 inches of rain was recorded on Friday with another 0.08 inches in the early hours of Saturday. For the majority of the week, strong northerly winds persisted, just like last week though we did have some southwesterlies on Thursday and Friday in advance of the front. Conditions were favorable for songbird movements during that timeframe, and the species variety exploded this weekend as a result. The average daily maximum sustained windspeed was 17.6 mph, with maximum gusts of 32 mph occurring on Saturday! Despite the winds though, Virginia Beach saw many first-of-season (FOS) arrivals this week, which included...Click Here to Continue Reading!

Cool and windy weather persisted for a second straight week here in Virginia Beach as the first half of April came to a close. Temperatures remained quite consistent with those from last week with an average daily high temperature of 64.9 degrees F (a minor 0.1 degree reduction from last week’s average); the average daytime lows rose a bit to 48.7 degrees F (a 2.7 degree increase). Only one of the seven days this week boasted rain, with totals on Tuesday (12 Apr) amounting to 0.4 inches. As with last week, winds this week remained a deterrent to spring songbird movement, as strong northerlies made it tough for the smaller species to fly against The average daily maximum sustained windspeed was 20.7 mph, with maximum gusts of 32 mph occurring on Monday, Wednesday & Sunday! However, just like last week, despite these conditions, birders across the region did manage to find some new year-species, and Virginia Beach’s first-of-season (FOS) arrivals this week included: American Redstart & Eastern Kingbird (12 Apr / Tracy Tate / Burroughs Road), Common Tern & Whimbrel (13 Apr / Tracy Tate & Andrew Baldelli / 85th Street Beach), Louisiana Waterthrush (13 Apr / Richard Fischer / First Landing State Park), Semipalmated Sandpiper (15 Apr / Bob Ake & Rebecca Walawender / Back Bay NWR), and Red-eyed Vireo (17 Apr / Rob Bielawski / Stumpy Lake Natural Area)...Click Here to Continue Reading!

High winds and an overall wide variety of weather conditions affected Virginia Beach and the surrounding region throughout the second week of April. Temperatures were rather up and down with 80 degree (F) warmth on Monday leading to frost conditions on Wednesday morning. Of course, this is coastal Virginia, so nothing should be surprising at this point. Overall, temperatures dropped considerably to a daily high of 65.0 degrees F (an 8.3 degree reduction from last week’s average) and the average daytime lows also dropped dramatically to 46.0 degrees F (a 9 degree shift). While precipitation totals remained low this week (0.11 in.), the wind was the real story, with maximum sustained winds of 39 mph, and gusts to 53 mph on Thursday. Windy conditions persisted throughout the majority of the week which caused rather unfavorable conditions for springtime songbird migration. Perhaps not truly severe weather, but we had a strong hail storm move through my neighborhood around noon on Saturday, despite being 50 degrees F at ground level. This was a good display of just how turbulent the atmosphere was at the time, as the temperature differential between the clouds and ground must have been quite severe to produce hail. Despite these conditions, birders across the region did manage to find some new...Click Here to Continue Reading!

The final week of March & the first of the April proved to be a rather up and down, though standard, spring week. Overall, temperatures increased a bit to a daily high of 73.6 degrees F (a 2.2 degree rise from last week’s average); the average daytime lows also rose slightly to 55.0 degrees F (up 1.9 degrees) and a total of 1.85 inches of rain fell during the week. No real severe weather impacted Virginia Beach this week, though high winds occurred overnight on Saturday, gusting to a maximum of 45 mph in the early hours of Sunday. With springtime progressing, we were again treated to several first-of-season (FOS) arrivals. This week’s arrivals included Lesser Yellowlegs (28 Mar / Rexanne Bruno / Back Bay NWR), Caspian Tern (29 Mar / Karen & Tom Beatty / Pleasure House Point NA), Green Heron (3 Apr / Eric Alton / Lake Joyce) and Yellow-billed Cuckoo (3 Apr / Back Bay NWR). The Cuckoo preceded the ‘extreme early’ date of 17 Apr listed in the Gold Book by a full two weeks, making it currently the earliest all-time record for the state of Virginia! Another species seen for the first time in Virginia Beach for the year was a single Wild Turkey (2 Apr / Rexanne Bruno / Oceana Boulevard). Of course, turkeys are not migratory species, and it has just taken this long for a report to pop up since they are very tough to find in Virginia Beach...Click Here to Continue Reading!

After the extreme heat of the previous week, it came as quite a surprise on Tuesday morning when those of us in Virginia Beach had to scrape ice off our vehicles (one last time?). But, temperatures evened out afterwards & eventually allowed the average to increase a bit to a daily high of 71.4 degrees F (a 1.4 degree rise from last week’s average); the average daytime lows also rose slightly to 53.1 degrees F (up 0.8 degrees) and a total of 1.08 inches of rain fell during the week, though the vast majority (1.02 in.) accumulated on Sunday. Weather conditions since the previous weekend seemed to not favor migration, as the northerly winds associated with the Nor’easter seemed to stop a number of species in their tracks. By the time Saturday & Sunday rolled around though, migration seems to catch back up properly, and Virginia Beach did see its first Piping Plovers (25 Mar, Bob Ake), Chimney Swifts (25 Mar, Karen & Tom Beatty), Northern Parula (26 Mar, Andrew Baldelli), and Barn Swallow (26 Mar, Tommy Maloney) of the season. Additionally, the first Cattle Egrets (27 Mar) & Yellow-throated Warbler (27 Mar, Isabel Eaton) of springtime were observed this weekend though some over-wintering individuals had been observed previously in 2016 due to the mild winter; these are the first instances I would classify as ‘spring...Click Here to Continue Reading!

While the third week of March started off with some extreme heat, reaching a maximum of 91 degrees F on Wednesday (our warmest day of 2016 thus far), it finished with cooler temperatures as a late season Nor’easter impacted the mid-Atlantic & New England coasts. Temperatures this week dropped a bit to an average daily high of 69.7 degrees F (an 8.2 degree drop from last week’s average), and the average daytime lows also dropped slightly to 52.3 degrees F (down 0.4 degrees); for a second straight week, 0.56 inches of precipitation accumulated through the Monday through Sunday timeframe. Weather conditions early in the week remained favorable for the arrival of spring migrants as southerly winds gave them a nice boost to reach our area. On Monday (14 Mar), the first Blue-gray Gnatcatchers of the year were observed at Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge (Peter Martin) and at Stumpy Lake Natural Area (Jonathon Snyder). Interestingly, this is the earliest known arrival date for this species in terms of eBird reports from past years. The Gold Book lists 30 Mar as their expected coastal plain arrival date, but with the warm winter, it seems they stayed further north than in year’s past, so they were able to arrive here much quicker than usual. I tend to consider their arrival to be the true start of springtime, since...Click Here to Continue Reading!

Springtime; that’ll be the headline for the second week of March 2016! Temperatures this week underwent a massive shift to an average daily high of 77.9 degrees F (an astonishing 20.3 degree rise over last week’s average), and the average daytime lows also increased to 52.7 degrees F (an extreme 11.8 degree rise); 0.56 inches of precipitation accumulated through the Monday through Sunday timeframe, though no real severe weather impacted the region. Incredibly, the week began with most of us having to scrape ice off our vehicles on Monday morning, but the very next day we hit 81 degrees F, and Thursday topped out for a weekly high of 84 degrees! This recalls the saying we recite & hear a lot locally, “if you don’t like the weather, stick around for 15 minutes!” The regional highlight this week was the return of the almost-mythical Lazuli Bunting that was first observed back on 16 Feb 2016 by Brooke Gordon at her private residence in the Shoulder’s Hill area of Suffolk! This individual had been absent since that date, but it was suddenly observed again at the residence on Wednesday (9 Mar) and the homeowner contacted the few individuals who had spent all day on 17 Feb attempting to see the bird. Those fortunate individuals were treated to a successful private viewing window on Saturday before a wider public...Click Here to Continue Reading!

During the first week of March, temperatures dropped a bit to an average daily high of 57.6 degrees F (-2.0 degree shift from the previous week), and the average daytime lows crashed to a blustery 40.9 degrees F (an extreme -9.8 degrees F shift); 0.9 inches of precipitation accumulated through the Monday through Sunday timeframe. While we started the week in the 70s, by Thursday the high temperatures stayed in the 40s through the remainder of the week. No instances of severe weather occurred during the week, but we did have rain on and off throughout the weekdays. Rarities were a bit tougher to come by than in previous weeks here in Virginia Beach, with the only true rarity observed being a Lark Sparrow at Princess Anne Athletic Commons near the intersection of Princess Anne Road and Dam Neck Road on Saturday (5 Mar, Staci Mueller). From analysis of the photographs of this individual and many photographs of the sparrow that had been at Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge since 7 Feb, it appears that this is a second adult bird. The Eurasian Wigeon that was observed at Wishart Lake in the Wishart Cove subdivision of Virginia Beach was not re-sighted at all this week despite multiple attempts by several observers according to eBird (myself included). This drake was last observed on 28 Feb, but perhaps the warm weather at the beginning of the week pushed... Click Here to Continue Reading!

During the final week of February, temperatures rose to an average daily high of 61.6 degrees F (+2.0 degree shift from previous week), and the average lows also rose to 50.1 degrees F (an extreme +12.7 degrees F shift); 0.4 inches of precipitation accumulated through the week. We had one instance of severe weather, occurring on Wednesday as a major cold front moved across the core of the continent, spawning a rash of tornadoes along the Gulf Coast and in northeastern North Carolina and crossing into Virginia. An EF1 tornado touched down nearly Waverly, VA killing 3 individuals. A second tornado, an EF3 hit Tappahannock later in the evening, causing mass injuries. Fortunately, Virginia Beach just experienced strong winds and some driving rain, but no injuries or casualties resulted from the unseasonal February storm event. While Wednesday was mostly a wash for birders, there was still a good number of rarity sightings throughout the week here. The Eurasian Wigeon drake that has become a winter resident on Wishart Lake was observed again on Sunday (Cheryl Jacobson) though the views of this lake from the roadways often required multiple visits before it happens to be in the right spot to be viewable. The Lark Sparrow that has been at Back Bay NWR for three weeks now continued at the same location with several sightings on both Saturday and Sunday... Click Here to Continue Reading!

Perhaps a bit of a slowdown in the quantity of rarity finds occurred over the last week, but, the quality of bird sightings remained high! On Monday morning, we were treated to another 2” of snow on the ground as it had fallen overnight while most of us slept. The snow did not seem to detour the Cape May Warbler that has been visiting the feeders of one Loretta Silvia, having been present now since 20 Jan according to eBird. On Tuesday, the snow had all melted away, but it left behind one incredible bird just outside Virginia Beach, over in the Pughsville/Shoulders Hill area of Suffolk. For the first time since 1975, a Lazuli Bunting was observed, and photographed by a homeowner (Brooke Gordon) as it fed in her backyard throughout the day. When the eBird report popped up, showing beautiful photographs, it wasn’t long before the whole trove of state birders knew about it. Many birders made a trip to the house on Wednesday in an attempt to observe this highly rare species within state borders, but it never made a return, even though it was being watched for from sun up to sun down. This is only the third record of the species for the state, so hopefully it will submitted to VARCOM by the observer, as it is a reviewable bird by the committee’s standards. Back in Virginia Beach, the Rose-breasted Grosbeak continued to be seen by Tommy Maloney through Saturday, and the Lark Sparrow... Click Here to Continue Reading!

Locations Visited: Virginia Beach, Virginia - Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Little Island Park, Pungo (Charity Neck, Nanney's Creek, Morris Neck, Fitztown, Back Bay Landing Roads).

Sightings Included: Wilson's Snipe, Fox Sparrow, Gray Catbird, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Gadwall, American Black Duck, Mallard, Tundra Swan, American Wigeon, Bald Eagle, Northern Harrier, Forster's Tern, Lark Sparrow, Killdeer, Horned Lark, American Pipit, White-throated Sparrow, Song Sparrow, Palm Warbler, Swamp Sparrow, Snow Goose.

The second week of February continued the hot streak for rarities across Virginia Beach and southeastern Virginia. On Monday (8 Feb), the adult Iceland Gull seen a week prior was picked up again by Andrew Baldelli up at 40th Street Beach. Also that same day, Eric Alton & Jonathon Snyder posted up a nice photograph into the HRWE Facebook Group that they had taken of the Western Tanager previous observed at Pleasure House Point Natural Area. The bird hadn’t been seen for over a week so it was nice to see that it had indeed stuck around. Karen & Tom Beatty... Click Here to Continue Reading!

Locations Visited: Virginia Beach, Virginia - 88th Street Beach, Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, First Landing State Park, Lake Wishart, Lynnhaven House Historic Site, Pleasure House Point Natural Area, Rudee Inlet, South Thimble Island.

Sightings Included: American Coot, Ruddy Duck, Hermit Thrush, Greater Yellowlegs (All First-of-Year Virginia Beach species), Black Scoter, Surf Scoter, Long-tailed Duck, Red-breasted Merganser, Gadwall, Great Blue Heron, Little Blue Heron, American Black Duck, Black Skimmer, Boat-tailed Grackle, Common Loon, Red-throated Loon, White-tailed Deer.

Last week set the bar high for rarities in Virginia Beach with the American White Pelicans, Iceland Gull and Western Tanager being seen over the weekend, and the nearby Snowy Owl in the East Beach neighborhood of Norfolk. This week started off with a bang on Monday, as John A. observed and photographed a Prairie Warbler at the campground area of First Landing State Park and sent the images in to me. Prairie Warblers are common summer residents in Virginia... Click Here to Continue Reading!

Locations Visited: Virginia Beach, Virginia - Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, First Landing State Park, Pleasure House Point Natural Area, Princess Anne Wildlife Management Area (Whitehurst Tract), Pungo, South Thimble Island.

Sightings Included: Red-shouldered Hawk, Fox Sparrow, Golden-crowned Kinglet, White-breasted Nuthatch, Brown Creeper, Winter Wren, Hairy Woodpecker, American Oystercatcher, Marsh Wren, Horned Lark, American Bittern (All First-of-Year Virginia Beach species), Black Scoter, Surf Scoter, Great Blue Heron, Little Blue Heron, American Black Duck, Black Skimmer, Boat-tailed Grackle, Common Loon.

While our brush with a powerful nor’easter was the headline last week, this final week of January will likely be remembered for the arrival of a Snowy Owl to Norfolk! In the wake of last weekend’s cold spell, the temperatures were on the rise from Monday through Wednesday, so it came as a great surprise when a report of a Snowy Owl was posted on the Virginia Pilot... Click Here to Continue Reading!

Locations Visited: Virginia Beach, Virginia - Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Kings Grant Lakes, Pleasure House Point Natural Area, Princess Anne Wildlife Management Area (Whitehurst Tract), Pungo, Rudee Inlet, South Thimble Island.

Sightings Included: Northern Pintail, Redhead, Green-winged Teal, Common Eider, Lesser Scaup, Cooper's Hawk, Savannah Sparrow, Dunlin, Wilson's Snipe, Common Yellowthroat, Clapper Rail, Little Blue Heron (All First-of-Year Virginia Beach species), Black Scoter, Surf Scoter, Red-breasted Merganser, Long-tailed Duck, Hooded Merganser, Brant, Bonaparte's Gull, Red-throated Loon, Common Loon, Peregrine Falcon, Red-tailed Hawk, Northern Harrier, Bald Eagle, Sharp-shinned Hawk, White Ibis.

The third week of January will be remembered for the massive Nor’easter that impacted the East Coast from Friday through Sunday. During the earlier portions of the week, as weather forecasts came more in line with a major blizzard event occurring, we began to develop lower and lower temperatures. On Tuesday, the first ice of the year began to form around the edges of... Click Here to Continue Reading!

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